SUPERVISED RESEARCH/ SCHOLARSHIP

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2016 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SHOWCASE 

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Activity: Poster Presentation & Research Group Award, UTSA Center for Civic Engagement
Year: 2016
Students: Laura Bustillo & Maria Hernandez
Course: Independent Study
Funding: Research Scholarship, Office of Undergraduate Research, University of Texas at San Antonio
Level: Undergraduate
Description: 

The assessment of parks accessibility barriers was conducted through establishing barriers indicators as an initial phase of a long-term project. The broader scope of the project would include analysis of residents’ socioeconomic status (SES), mapping the barriers, assessment of nonphysical barriers and quality audits, accessibility barriers model (ABM), and proposing an improvement plan.

 

Establishing Indicators for Accessibility Barriers: establishing a list of indicators used in previous literature and cities to create a baseline for San Antonio measures of accessibility through the following indicators:

 

Physical Indicators

  • Walking distance (based on optimum walkability standard measures)

  • Access routes (streets, roads, bridges, highways)

  • Biking feasibility (distance, slope, lanes, intersections, and signage)

  • Number and locations of park entrances

  • Infrastructure quality (i.e. sidewalks availability, width, and quality)

  • Slopes and change in elevation

  • Building density in the half a mile radius

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2015 UNDERGRADUATE  RESEARCH SHOWCASE 

Activity: Poster Presentation
Year: 2015
Student: Neriah Holly
Course: Independent Study
Funding: Research Scholarship, Office of Undergraduate Research, UTSA
Level: Undergraduate
Description: 
Description: 

The results of mapping the location, zoning, and other criteria of vacant parcels led to a 3D map containing potential mixed use infill. The potential massing (marked as red) stands on the current vacant properties.  Each massing was extruded within the zoning allowable height which averaged from 3 stories (for properties off of low traffic streets and 5 stories (for properties off of high traffic streets). The majority of large potential mixed use sites are present near the outskirts of the downtown city density. The majority of smaller sites lay within the density fabric.

It can be concluded that most infill can occur at a great dispersed rate within Downtown San Antonio. These locations are close to many commercial work hubs and attractions. They provide strategic locations to for living and working buildings. If they can be utilized to their fullest potential, San Antonio can become a vital smart and sustainable community.

After analysis the vacant sites located in the downtown neighborhood, we found a total of 25 eligible parcels for infill residential development. These parcels are located within a walkable distance from the major Tourists Attractions, Schools, and Public parks. The total area available for infill development as well as the types of zoning of available sites

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2015 TEXAS HEALTH BUILT ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

Activity: Poster Presentations
Year: 2015
Students: 14 Students in Senior Studio (ARC4246)
Course: Senior Architecture Studio, University of Texas at San Antonio
Studio: ARC 4246
Level: Undergraduate

TEAM 1: CANALILLO

Team 1: Hayley Davis, Jennifer Uria, Angela Velasquez, Roshan Patel, Maria Rodriguez,
Project Summary:
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TEAM 2: STUDENT REACH

Team 2: Eric Liedtke, Brandon Ramon, Oscar Yanez, Ilse Castro, James Gray,
Project Summary:
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TEAM 3: CONNECT

Team 3: Samuel Pena, Jesus Garcia, Mauricio Reyes, Eduardo Perez, Karen Apellanzia,
Project Summary:
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2014 TEXAS HEALTH BUILT ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE

Activity: Best Poster Presentation Award
Year: 2014
Students: Betzaida Pollet, Kimberly Hopkins, and Nicole Thomas
Course: Advanced Planning Method, UTSA
Level: Graduate 
Description: 

During the last decade cities have begun to embrace a changing culture to implement a proactive healthy lifestyle, a community driven resolution to local issues, and encouraging public/environmentally friendly modes of transportation. It is through this lens that the approach laid out for Gardendale Neighborhood was evaluated and assessed.

The main objective that is the focus of this project is to increase quality of life through improving safety and accessibility within the neighborhood. Through multiple forms of analysis, findings show correlations between various variables that lead to proposals focusing on access to green spaces, mixed use developments, and extensions of transportation. It is through exploration of demographics and land use within the neighborhood that drew a clear association to the recommendations outlined in this paper. It is concluded that the proposed additions will create a sense of place, connectivity, and increased health outcomes for the neighborhood residents as well as tie into existing city plans.

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PROPOSED

LINEAR PARKWAY

AIA BALTIMORE RESEARCH/ TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP

Activity: Research & Travel Scholarship
Year: 2008/2009
Student: Chinyere Goddard
Course: Supervised Research on Peruvian Vernacular Architecture.
Funding: AIA competitive proposal-based funding, Morgan State University
Level: Undergraduate
Project Summary:
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AIA BALTIMORE RESEARCH/ TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP

Activity: Research & Travel Scholarship
Year: 2008/2009
Student: Jeanne Schleicher 
Course: Supervised Research on Mixed-income Development in Mega Cities with a focus on NYC.
Funding: AIA competitive proposal-based funding, Morgan State University
Level: Undergraduate
Project Summary: